Trevis Smith

TREVIS SMITH

Founder

Trevis Smith, C.A.T.C., is the Founder of Profound Treatment. He has worked variously as a detox counselor, case manager and sober companion since entering the field of addiction treatment in 2006. Trevis is a clinically trained interventionist, and particularly adept at coordinating care for both addiction and co-occurring disorders. Trevis has a reputation for being one of the regions premier pioneers in private treatment founding what is now considered one of the most prominent addiction treatment programs in the United States. Often cited by clients and families alike to be one of the most inspiring individuals on the team, Trevis brings an incredible personal story of triumph over adversity which he draws upon to help clients realize that no situation is insurmountable. His strength lies in his broad proficiencies in assisting clients to set objectives which allow them to advance towards healthy living, recovery, and healing. Family members frequently convey that his motivational and caring approach, along with the client’s hard work, accomplishes in a short time what their loved one has sought to achieve for years.
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substance abuse treatment

Substance abuse treatment are mostly found as called Outpatient commitment—also called Assisted Outpatient Treatment (AOT) or a Community Treatment Order (CTO). AOT have too been called CTO (community treatment order). substance abuse treatment are also commonly searched for as Sober living houses (SLH), more commonly called sober homes and sober living homes and more rarely sober living environments. substance abuse treatment are facilities used by people recovering from alcohol and substance abuse that serve as an interim environment between rehab and mainstream society. substance abuse treatment or SLHs grew out of a need to have safe and supportive places in which people could live while they were vulnerable in early recovery. They are primarily meant to provide housing for people who have just come out of rehab (or recovery centers) and need a place to live that is structured and supporting for those in recovery. However, it is not necessary to come from rehab. 

Sober living houses (SLHs) are “alcohol- and drug-free living environments for individuals attempting to maintain abstinence from alcohol and drugs”. Many of them are structured around 12-step programs and sound recovery methodologies. Many are also certified or governed by Sober Living Coalitions or Networks. Residents are often required to participate in 12-step meetings, take drug tests and show demonstrably that they are taking important steps to long lasting recovery. “Because there is no formal monitoring of SLHs that are not affiliated with associations or coalitions, it is impossible to provide an exact number of SLH or substance abuse treatment. Drug rehabilitation is commonly searched when looking for substance abuse treatment. 

Drug Rehabilitation is the process of medical or psychotherapeutic treatment for dependency on psychoactive substances such as alcohol, prescription drugs, and street drugs such as marijuana, cocaine, heroin or amphetamines. The general intent is to enable the patient to confront substance dependence, if present, and cease substance abuse to avoid the psychological, legal, financial, social, and physical consequences that can be caused, especially by extreme abuse. Treatment includes medication for depression or other disorders, counseling by experts and sharing of experience with other addicts.

Psychiatry also comes up when searching for substance abuse treatment. Psychiatry is the medical specialty devoted to the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of mental disorders. These include various maladaptations related to mood, behavior, cognition, and perceptions. See glossary of psychiatry.

Initial psychiatric assessment of a person typically begins with a case history and mental status examination. Physical examinations and psychological tests may be conducted. On occasion, neuro-imaging or other neurophysiological techniques are used. Mental disorders are often diagnosed in accordance with clinical concepts listed in diagnostic manuals such as the International Classification of Diseases (ICD), edited and used by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the widely used Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders(DSM), published by the American Psychiatric Association (APA). The fifth edition of the DSM (DSM-5) was published in 2013 which re-organized the larger categories of various diseases and expanded upon the previous edition to include information/insights that are consistent with current research.

substance abuse treatment

Substance abuse treatment are sometimes called a Support group. In a support group, members provide each other with various types of help, usually nonprofessional and nonmaterial, for a particular shared, usually burdensome, characteristic. Members with the same issues can come together for sharing coping strategies, to feel more empowered and for a sense of community. The help may take the form of providing and evaluating relevant information, relating personal experiences, listening to and accepting others’ experiences, providing sympathetic understanding and establishing social networks. 

A support group may also work to inform the public or engage in advocacy. Formal support groups may appear to be a modern phenomenon, but they supplement traditional fraternal organizations such as Freemasonry in some respects, and may build on certain supportive functions (formerly) carried out in (extended) families. Other types of groups formed to support causes, including causes outside of themselves, are more often called advocacy groups, interest groups, lobby groups, pressure groups or promotional groups. 

Trade unions and many environmental groups, for example, are interest groups. The term support group in this article refers to peer-to-peer support. Support groups ( substance abuse treatment) maintain interpersonal contact among their members in a variety of ways. Traditionally, groups have met in person in sizes that allowed conversational interaction. Support groups (substance abuse treatment) also maintain contact through printed newsletters, telephone chains, internet forums, and mailing lists. Membership in some support groups is formally controlled, with admission requirements and membership fees. Other groups are “open” and allow anyone to attend an advertised meeting, for example, or to participate in an online forum.

Another term sometimes used for substance abuse treatment is A self-help support group. This is fully organized and managed by its members, who are commonly volunteers and have personal experience in the subject of the group’s focus. These groups may also be referred to as fellowships, peer support groups, lay organizations, mutual help groups, or mutual aid self-help groups. Most common are 12-step groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous and self-help groups for mental health.